Avoid the top 10 dating blundersdating guide


03-Nov-2020 02:25

avoid the top 10 dating blundersdating guide-75

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"Often they'll target older adults, who they perceive as holding the majority of wealth in this country." This just might be the biggest consumer scam in the U. That's one American duped out of an average 4 nearly every 10 seconds.

Here's how the scam typically unfolds: You get an unsolicited call from someone claiming to be with Microsoft or Windows tech support, who says viruses have been detected on your computer.

"They're almost impossible to counterfeit." But here's the scam.

The FTC is warning that con artists are impersonating card issuers and sending emails requesting personal and financial information, or asking that you click on a malware-laced link before being issued a new card.

Instead of giving cash to door-to-door solicitors or your credit card number to callers, ask for more information about the charity (brochures, websites) so you can investigate the cause first.

Also be wary of popular online giving sites such as

Plus, scammers are getting more devious: Sometimes "IRS" shows up on caller ID, the con artists supply their "badge numbers" and they know the last four digits of your Social Security number.

Your Plan Do not return a call from someone claiming to be with the IRS. If you're ever in doubt about an IRS matter, call the agency directly at 800-829-1040.

Abagnale, a former con artist who became a long time FBI consultant on scams and is now AARP's Fraud Watch Network Ambassador. "The data is protected in an integrated circuit [rather than a magnetic strip], and there's a dynamic code that resets after each use," explains Vernon Marshall, senior vice president and functional risk officer for American Express.In order to protect your data, you are told to immediately call up a certain website and follow its instructions.A dummy screen may appear that shows viruses being detected and eliminated, but in reality malware is being installed that allows the scammer to steal your usernames and passwords, hold your data for ransom or even use the webcam to spy on you. "Neither Microsoft nor our partners make unsolicited phone calls," says Courtney Gregoire, senior attorney at the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit.They pretend to be from a consumer group or law enforcement agency and trick you into thinking they'll help get your money back — for a fee." 3. This is personal info you willingly divulge by entering giveaways and sweepstakes, or when filling out surveys.

"Scammers use all this to create profiles for who they want to target," Nofziger says. According to Microsoft, in 2015 an estimated 3.3 million people — many of them seniors — were victimized by a tech-support con, at a total cost of

"Scammers use all this to create profiles for who they want to target," Nofziger says. According to Microsoft, in 2015 an estimated 3.3 million people — many of them seniors — were victimized by a tech-support con, at a total cost of $1.5 billion.

She even shaved her head and staged "Bingo for Brandi" fundraisers, authorities say.

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"Scammers use all this to create profiles for who they want to target," Nofziger says. According to Microsoft, in 2015 an estimated 3.3 million people — many of them seniors — were victimized by a tech-support con, at a total cost of $1.5 billion.She even shaved her head and staged "Bingo for Brandi" fundraisers, authorities say.

.5 billion.

She even shaved her head and staged "Bingo for Brandi" fundraisers, authorities say.